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Showing posts from April, 2009

Fog and Fyre

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When it comes to making art by pushing buttons and turning dials, there ought to be a general rule of thumb that says push every button, turn every dial.  If it's there - turn it.

I just discovered the blur thing.  It's always been there, but I guess I just thought it made things blurry and that's not terribly interesting.  But I've discovered that the two blur parameters, blur-something and blur-something else are very interesting.



The second image in a series I've titled, Smudge.  The first one didn't look cool when I looked at it a day later, so I deleted it.  The blur effect is quite powerful and adds a unique style to the images.  I guess you just don't know what the result of some parameter change will be until you see the results.



The above was left to render for a much longer time in order to made the light, translucent forms more visible.  The blur does create the expected cold, foggy, wet, rocky seashore look and the black and white color limitat…

The Wheel of Digital Art

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The digital medium allows for some very strange, head-warping things to be done.  For instance, one can take one piece of art in it's final state, completed and ready for viewing, and use it as the raw material for another, completely new and different work of art.  This is more than a mere "reworking"; it's a complete transformation of one thing into another where only the artist (i.e. machine operator) knows what has happened.



Made in Fyre, the above image is blown up to four times its size and transformed by Showfoto's block wave filter.  I then cropped out a piece which is shown just below.



As always, sometimes it makes something interesting and sometimes it doesn't.  I tried it on twenty or so images and came up with the following results:



The above, using the same procedure I just mentioned, yielded the image below:





The same thing again, from the above to produce the one below, which is a cropped out detail of the 4x image.





Above image used to make the one b…

Can Bad Fractals be Good Art?

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Pantheon

Good software makes images that are too slick.  It's hard to get good software to make smudgy, jagged, off-color stuff.  Purebred imagery is predictable.  Artists often make junk and crazy mistakes but it's a process of trial and error that leads to new styles.  Good software and professional skills is a toxic combination that gets everything right the first time and inevitably leads to the best fractals -- a dead end.

I've given the fractal world many bad examples to follow and, unless my disciples are all off in the desert hiding, no one seems to be following my liquid path down the drain.  But success and popularity are difficult obstacles to overcome.  The encouragement of others is sometimes all it takes to keep someone going down a fruitless path to a heartless goal.

If you want to help someone produce better art, not necessarily better fractals, challenge them with negative criticism and encourage them to give it up.  When the lights of success and encourageme…